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Transportation
Fly to My House?



Fly to My House?
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 7
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   8.84

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    taxiways, suburban, observation, landing, visibility, jets, withstand, aircraft, creativity, flights, internet, series, aerial, intermediate, minimum, jumbo
     content words:    Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, United States, Newark Liberty, New Jersey, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport, Federal Aviation Administration


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Fly to My House?
By Trista L. Pollard
  

1     We have come a long way since the Wright brothers saw an aerial view of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. They would probably be surprised to know their curiosity and creativity gave birth to one of our most important forms of modern transportation. Everyday airplanes take off and land at airports around the world. You know you need to go to these huge buildings to get on a plane, but what do you really know about airports?
 
2     In the United States there are about 16,000 airports. All of these airports vary in size. There are smaller airstrips that may handle only one plane per day. There are also larger airports like O'Hare in Chicago, Illinois, Newark Liberty in Newark, New Jersey, and Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia. Hartsfield-Jackson is considered to be one of the world's busiest airports because it handles about 800,000 flights per year. So what are the requirements for building a major airport?
 
3     When architects and aeronautical engineers look at sites for airports, they are searching for areas with extremely level ground. This ground should also be firm and drain easily. The areas for future runways will need to have very few trees, buildings, and hills. Pilots need as much visibility as possible when landing their planes. The areas around runways should also be clear of possible smoke and weather that produces low visibility. This is why very few airports are located in swamp or arid deserts.

Paragraphs 4 to 7:
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