edHelper.com
Geography
Science of Location



Science of Location
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grade 5
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   8.42

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    labor-during, system-plantation, economics, emails, immigrate, latitude, finding, modify, economic, absolute, early, ecology, rotation, based, internet, cultural
     content words:    Delaware Water Gap, United States, Native American, Great Plains


Print Science of Location
     Print Science of Location  (font options, pick words for additional puzzles, and more)


Quickly Print - PDF format
     Quickly Print: PDF (2 columns per page)

     Quickly Print: PDF (full page)


Quickly Print - HTML format
     Quickly Print: HTML


Proofreading Activity
     Print a proofreading activity


Feedback on Science of Location
     Leave your feedback on Science of Location  (use this link if you found an error in the story)



Science of Location
By Trista L. Pollard
  

1     Early explorers knew there was more land beyond their countries' shores. That is why they navigated through stormy seas to reach these lands. Thanks to their need for adventure, our first maps were made. The science of geography was also born.
 
2     For many years, geography was known as the "science of location." When you think of geography, you think of finding states, countries, and mountains. In fact, mapping the Earth is only a small part. Geography also includes studies about people, culture, ecology, history, and economics. Geographers do want to know where everyone and everything is located on Earth. However, they also want to know how we affect our environment. For this reason, geography includes five different themes. They are location, place, movement, human/environment interaction, and region.
 
3     Location is the most well known part of geography. Explorers helped to show us the wonders of Earth through their observations. They used the stars and the horizon to determine direction. Navigators figured out that the shape and rotation of the Earth was related to mapping and direction. Today geographers look at the absolute and relative locations of places. Absolute or exact location of places can be measured using latitude and longitude. Your town has an absolute location based on latitude and longitude. Your street address is the absolute location of your house. Relative location compares one location with its surrounding area. Your summer camp may be near the Delaware Water Gap. Your school may be about forty minutes from Philadelphia. Early explorers believed that sailing west from Europe would help them reach Asia. Geographers use landmarks, time, direction, and distance to describe relative location.

Paragraphs 4 to 8:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



Weekly Reading Books

          Create Weekly Reading Books

Prepare for an entire week at once!


Geography
             Geography


More Activities, Lesson Plans, and Worksheets


Back to School
Graphic Organizers
Alphabet Worksheets
Sight Words
Math Worksheets
Mazes
50 States
Education
Teaching

Monthly Themes
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

Fractions
Place Value
Time and Calendar
Money
Earth Day
Solar System
Analogies
Nouns
Following Directions
Listening
Capitalization
Cursive Writing
Patterns and Sequencing
Dinosaurs
All About Me

Kindergarten
First Grade
Second Grade
Third Grade
Fourth Grade
Fifth Grade
Sixth Grade

Multiplication
Division
Main Idea
Cause and Effect
Measurement
Decimals
Rounding
Order of Operations
Verbs
Community Helpers
Adjectives
Plants
Grammar
Addition and Subtraction
Contractions
Bulletin Board Ideas
Word Searches
Crossword Puzzles
Printable Puzzles

Reading Comprehension
Reading Skills
English Language Arts





Copyright © 2013 edHelper