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Take Me Out to the Ballgame - The World Series



Take Me Out to the Ballgame - The World Series
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 7
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   5.2

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    ballgame, outwit, proposal, traditional, generate, behavior, celebration, leagues, nation, public, year, truce, tournament, pastime, champion, title
     content words:    World Series, Providence Grays, National League, Metropolitan Club, American Association, United States, World Champions, Pittsburgh Pirates, American League, When August


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Take Me Out to the Ballgame - The World Series
By Jane Runyon
  

1     Each year, as autumn spreads across the nation, many people start to smell peanuts and hot dogs. They oil up their mitts. They make sure their favorite baseball caps are formed to their heads. What brings out this traditional behavior? Why, the World Series, of course. The tradition of picking a favorite team to root for is over 100 years old. Let's go back and see how this national celebration began.
 
2     Baseball teams have been playing each other for bragging rights since the 1800's. In 1884, the Providence Grays of the National League beat the Metropolitan Club of the American Association in a three game series. They were declared "Champions of the United States." Some newspapermen even went so far as to call them "World Champions." The name stuck. At the end of each season, the winners of each league played each other. Sometimes they played the best of seven games. Some years they went as far as to play the best of sixteen.
 
3     In 1891, the American Association suddenly ceased to exist. The National League took over the management of the teams in the American Association. The public had a hard time supporting any kind of tournament devised for just one league. Just two years later, the whole idea was dropped.

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