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Panic, Preparation, Practice, and Panache, Part 2



Panic, Preparation, Practice, and Panache, Part 2
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   4.74

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    buff, presentation, run-through, battlefield, observation, writing, script, material, rent, series, identify, especially, assignment, readily, confidence, amount
     content words:    Civil War


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Panic, Preparation, Practice, and Panache, Part 2
By Beth Beutler
  

1     So, you've got your assignment. You have to give a speech or presentation on a certain day. You have your topic. You are trying to approach the project with confidence rather than panic. (See part 1.) Now, you have to get your material ready.
 
2     Here are some tips for preparing for your speech.
 
3     1. Start on it right away. You may be tempted to put off working on your speech, especially if it is several weeks away. However, it is best to work on it a little at a time and then feel more prepared when the time comes to present it. So, the first week you receive your assignment, begin to do a little research. You may want to visit the library or surf the Internet for facts about your topic. An advantage to starting early is that your mind will have more time to be focused on the topic, and you may end up picking up more information. (See tip 3.)
 
4     2. Start with what you know. Early in the preparation process, get by yourself and pretend you are in front of the audience and have to say whatever you already know about the topic. Give the speech "off the top of your head." This exercise will help you set a vision for what you want the presentation to sound like. Plus, you'll be able to identify sub points that may need more research.

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