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Early History of the State of Alabama the Beautiful


Early History of the State of Alabama the Beautiful
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   8.27

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    statehood, archaeologists, state, southeastern, legislature, gain, settled, needless, landforms, working, natural, goods, government, plantation, become, petition
     content words:    North America, North Alabama, Tennessee River, United States Congress, Mississippi Territory, Creek War, Alabama Territory, President Monroe, Washington County


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Early History of the State of Alabama the Beautiful
By Lucy Bumpers
  

1     Alabama is a state of contrasting landforms. It has mountains, hills, and flatlands. These major landforms and other natural features of each of the five regions are what give the state of Alabama its own identity of "Alabama the Beautiful."
 
2     Along with the landforms, Alabama is full of streams and waterways. There are many rivers which have been long used for transportation of humans, animals, and goods. These natural resources were of great use for the Native people living in our rich land. Archaeologists have theorized that the first people to come to Alabama came across a land bridge between Asia and North America. There are scientists who believe the people were following the animals on hunting trips across this bridge. These early Native people first settled in North Alabama because of the caves used for shelter and the Tennessee River which runs across the top of the state.
 
3     These people evolved into four major prehistoric groups: Archaic, Paleo, Woodland, and Mississippian. As each group evolved, it began to produce new products which made living in Alabama easier. Many of these groups moved southward and established villages along waterways and inland areas. Eventually, the last group of prehistoric people died out, from what is anyone's guess. Many scientists believe they contracted some kind of disease that killed almost everyone. This is only conjecture.

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