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Arizona - The True Wild, Wild West


Arizona - The True Wild, Wild West
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   6.79

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    impression, gunfight, travelers, stagecoach, wealthy, flocks, religion, tourist, stunt, chief, traveled, attack, schools, fell, guys, agreement
     content words:    Native Americans, These Native American, Many Indians, United States, Gadsden Purchase, Peaceful Indians, Some Indians, Many Navajo Indians, Long Walk, New Mexico


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Arizona - The True Wild, Wild West   

1     If your impression of Arizona is fighting between cowboys and Indians, your impression is correct. If your impression of Arizona is a gunfight at the O.K. Corral in Tombstone, your impression is correct. If your impression of Arizona is a stagecoach carrying a sharpshooter to fight off robbers or Indians, your impression is correct. However, there is a lot more to the story of Arizona's history!
 
2     Arizona's history begins with the people who first came to Arizona, the Native Americans. These are the people who used to be called Indians. Over 4,000 years ago, the people who lived in Arizona were nomads. Nomads are people who do not stay in one place very long. The nomads who traveled through Arizona were looking for food. They were hunting animals and collecting wild plants to eat.
 
3     Some of the nomads stayed in Arizona, and ancient tribes began. These Native American tribes planted crops. They used ditches called canals to bring water to their fields. About 1500 A.D., these ancient tribes disappeared. A drought, a long period of time when no rain fell, made the farmland dry up. No crops grew. No food grew for animals to eat, so the animals left. The Native Americans didn't want to starve, so they left their homes and lands.
 
4     After many years, water returned. Other tribes moved to the desert. Some of these tribes began to farm the land again. One of the new tribes was the Apaches. The Apaches did not farm the land. The Apaches were nomads. They thought that the land belonged to everyone. They also thought the land was owned by no one.

Paragraphs 5 to 13:
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