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Walking in Their Footsteps: Tracing Maryland's Early Settlements


Walking in Their Footsteps: Tracing Maryland's Early Settlements
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   9.84

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    economic, emigrate, separation, tread, westward, society, introduction, commitment, foundation, leadership, contrast, social, provided, historical, arrival, mining
     content words:    New World, Native American, Clements Island, Maryland Day, George Calvert, America-the Calvert, Terra Maria, Mary Land, Accohannock Indian, Native Americans


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Walking in Their Footsteps: Tracing Maryland's Early Settlements
By Carolyn Murphy
  

1     Settlers came to the New World for varying desires and interests yet were unified by the belief that their voices were important in the quest for freedom. Leaving their countries, the settlers were bound to set down footsteps in a new area. The first settlers came to Maryland from England committed to religious freedom, separation of church and state, and a desire for new land and opportunities. Let's trace the settlers' steps through Maryland's time including their arrival in the New World, their introduction to local Native American groups, and the development of the foundation of a new society - government, laws, and social codes.
 
2     The early settlers came from England tired of the restraints which they experienced. The shared values among the settlers were the desires for religious freedom and new opportunities. The settlers wanted the opportunity to spiritually express ideas which were often in contrast to and not approved for discourse by the Church of England. Settlers also were very interested in the prospects of land and new jobs. This sparked their voyage to America on two ships, the Ark and the Dove. After a four month trip, the English settlers arrived at St. Clements Island, Maryland, on March 25, 1634. Maryland recognizes this day each year as Maryland Day. The founder of this Maryland colony was George Calvert. The Maryland flag symbolizes two key families starting the new colony in America-the Calvert family and the Crossland family. The new leadership started under the direction of George Calvert. The King of England believed that Maryland should be named after the Queen. Its initial name was Terra Maria or Mary Land.
 
3     Upon the settlers' arrival to St. Clements Island and other parts of Maryland, they discovered Native American settlements in the area. Along the eastern shore region, including the islands, was the Accohannock Indian tribe. Native American groups included the Accohannock, the Assateague, and others. Native Americans often provided support in teaching settlers about agriculture. Tobacco and corn soon emerged as two key crops traded during this time.
 
4     There were many different immigrant groups who came to Maryland during the early period. Some of these immigrant groups traveling to the New World and forming colonies were English, African, and Irish. William Penn encouraged many Germans to emigrate to the New World.

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