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New Hampshire: A Small State with a Big History


New Hampshire: A Small State with a Big History
Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   7.23

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    curiosity, wavered, militia, motto, lasted, death, constitutional, ninth, beginning, gunpowder, fell, battle, separate, perhaps, however, history
     content words:    New Hampshire, Bartholomew Gosnold, Martin Pring, Captain John Smith, New England Coast, King James, Merrimac River, Kennebec River, David Thomson, John Mason


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New Hampshire: A Small State with a Big History
By Phyllis Naegeli
  

1     Many years ago, explorers sailed along the coast of what is now New Hampshire. Perhaps the natives living here watched with curiosity. What were these strange vessels floating along the horizon? Who were the people walking along their decks?
 
2     Men such as Bartholomew Gosnold, Martin Pring, and Captain John Smith explored much of the New England Coast in the early seventeenth century. King James I took a great interest in this land. What type of riches would be found there? He wanted to know. In 1622, the king gave the land from the Merrimac River to the Kennebec River to Mr. David Thomson, a Scottish gentleman. Mr. Thomson went on to start the first European settlement at Piscataqua. The settlement lasted only a short time.
 
3     The first permanent settlement was started in 1623 at Dover. Soon, four towns grew up - Dover, Exeter, Hampton, and Portsmouth. In 1629, John Mason was given the land between the Merrimac and Piscataqua Rivers. He called it "New Hampshire" after his home of Hampshire, England. The future state had gained its name.

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