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Transportation
Jet Reaction, Part 2

Transportation
Transportation


Jet Reaction, Part 2
Print Jet Reaction, Part 2 Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

Print Jet Reaction, Part 2 Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Jet Reaction, Part 2 Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 7
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   10.45

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    afterburner, air-bleed, air-breathing, air-compressor, airstream, bleed-off, combusts, compressor, hypersonic, jet-propelled, orifice, payload, propeller-driven, pulsejet, ramjet, resonant-jet
     content words:    Jet Reaction, Sir Isaac, Third Law, Wilbur Wright, Concorde SST


Jet Reaction, Part 2
By Trista L. Pollard
  

1     As you read in Jet Reaction, Part 1, the birth of the reaction engine was due to many scientists throughout the years. When airplanes first flew onto the scene, their motion was produced by propeller-driven engines. Scientists and inventors in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries began to develop airstream or jet engines to use in aircraft.
 
2     Jet engines have four basic parts: a compressor, a turbine, a combustion chamber, and propelling nozzles. Air taken in the jet engine is compressed. Afterwards, the air is sent through chambers where its volume will increase due to the heat of fuel combustion. When the air is released from the chambers, it spins the compression rotors. This allows the rotors to act on the incoming air.
 
3     Jet propulsion engines are similar to reciprocating engines. Inside their combustion chambers a fuel mixture is burned, and the gas that is produced expands. This gas escapes through an orifice or hole to form a jet or stream. The propelling nozzles provide this escape route for the jets. The reason jet propulsion engines are also called reaction motors is due to Sir Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion. Newton's law states that the force that causes high-speed motion of a jet of gas must have a reaction force that is equal in magnitude or speed and oppositely directed to push on the jet propulsion engine. Just like automobile engines, there are also different types of jet propulsion engines.

Paragraphs 4 to 5:
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