Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Pets Theme Unit
Setting Up an Aquarium

Pets Theme Unit
Pets Theme Unit


Setting Up an Aquarium
Print Setting Up an Aquarium Reading Comprehension with Fourth Grade Work

Print Setting Up an Aquarium Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

Print Setting Up an Aquarium Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Setting Up an Aquarium Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   6.57

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    angelfish, aquarists, cichlids, dechlorination, ever-expanding, fanatical, fanaticism, generic, goldfish-shaped, sick-looking, sturgeon, tetras, well-decorated, exotic, classic, definitely
     content words:    Even Davy Jones, New Tank Syndrome, One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish


Setting Up an Aquarium
By Colleen Messina
  

1     If cats make you sneeze and snakes make your skin crawl, maybe you need an aquatic pet. Fish can be fascinating, and they are much easier to take care of than their furry or scaly friends. Taking the plunge into having an aquarium can be exciting.
 
2     One advantage of pet fish is that you can make your aquarium either simple or complicated. Owning a goldfish is like dipping your toe into a meandering stream. Even a small child can do it under a watchful adult eye. Later, you can move your way up to exotic saltwater fish as you gain experience. Having a saltwater tank without learning a lot first would be like running full speed to the edge of a dock and jumping into a cold lake.
 
3     There is nothing fishy about setting up a basic aquarium. Twenty to thirty gallon tanks work well. Glass tanks work better than acrylic ones because they cost less and don't scratch easily. If you happen to find a good fish tank deal at a garage sale, be sure it doesn't leak and don't buy a scratched one because lots of slimy, green algae can grow in the cracks.
 
4     Happy fish often live in water that is just the right temperature. A heater is the best way to make sure that the tank is "just right" for your pet. The perfect temperature for most freshwater and saltwater tanks is 77 degrees Fahrenheit. If your fish get too hot, you might have an aquarium full of bouillabaisse (fish soup) in the morning.
 
5     Aquariums also require other equipment. All tanks have to have filters to keep the water clean and to filter out waste. They also help trap dirt, plant leaves, or uneaten fish flakes. An air pump makes bubbles that give your fish oxygen. Hoods can reduce water evaporation and protect your fish from other creatures in your house, like cats. Lights make it easy to watch your fish and can help fresh plants grow.

Paragraphs 6 to 13:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



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Pets Theme Unit
             Pets Theme Unit



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