Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)

Nullification and Secession

A Nation Divided<BR>(1840-1861)
A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)


Nullification and Secession
Print Nullification and Secession Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

Print Nullification and Secession Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Nullification and Secession Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   6.88

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    calhoun, farm-based, same-states, tariff, deals, military, anti-slavery, affected, mainly, slavery, possible, equal, wealth, federal, costly, economy
     content words:    South Carolina, Vice President John C., President Jackson, Missouri Compromise, Confederate States, Fort Sumter, Other Southern, North Carolina, Civil War


Nullification and Secession
By Mary L. Bushong
  

1     Is it possible for two events that seem to have nothing in common to be linked in splitting apart a country? Though they seem unlike on the surface, the issues under them are the same—states' rights.
 
2     The Ordinance of Nullification (null-ih-fi-KAY-shun) was passed by the state of South Carolina in 1832. It was in reply to a heavy tariff (TARE-if) passed by Congress in 1828. A tariff is a tax that is applied to goods coming into the country. It was used to increase the money to build new roads. It also helped make the prices of costly Northern goods more equal.
 
3     Since the new rich of the South were big spenders, they saw the tax as aimed mainly at them. Their complaints to Congress seemed to be ignored. Vice President John C. Calhoun (from South Carolina) was for states' rights. He supported his state taking action on its own to fix the problem.
 
4     The Ordinance of Nullification was passed by the state in November 1832. This new law said that the tax could be ignored; it was against the rights of states and against the constitution.
 
5     President Jackson was angered by this. He believed that the good of the federal government was more important than state's rights. He threatened the port of Charleston, SC with military action.

Paragraphs 6 to 11:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



Weekly Reading Books

          Create Weekly Reading Books

Prepare for an entire week at once!


Feedback on Nullification and Secession
Leave your feedback on Nullification and Secession  (use this link if you found an error in the story)



A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)

             A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)



United States
             United States


    American Government  
 
    Black History and Blacks in U.S. History  
 
    Children in History  
 
    Government Careers  
 
    Hispanic Heritage  
 
    How Can I Help?  
 
 
    Immigration  
 
    National Parks and Monuments  
 
    Native Americans  
 
    Presidents of the United States  
 
    Women's History  
 


United States History
    A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)
 
 
    A New Nation
(1776-1830)
 
 
    After the Civil War
(1865-1870)
 
 
    American Revolution  
 
    Cold War
(1947-1991)
 
 
    Colonial America (1492-1776)  
 
    Lewis and Clark
(1804-1806)
 
 
    Pearl Harbor  
 
    Spanish American War (1898)  
 
    The 1890's  
 
    The 1900's  
 
    The 1910's  
 
    The 1920's  
 
    The 1930's  
 
 
    The 1940's  
 
    The 1950's  
 
    The 1960's  
 
    The 1970's  
 
    The 1980's  
 
    The 1990's  
 
    The 2000's  
 
    The Civil War
(1861-1865)
 
 
    The Great Depression
(1929-1945)
 
 
    The United States Grows
(1865-1900)
 
 
    The War of 1812  
 
    Wild, Wild West  
 
    World War I
(1914-1918)
 
 
    World War II  
 


50 States

             Fifty States Theme Unit


Document Based Activities
      Document Based Activities



Copyright © 2017 edHelper