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Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Black History and Blacks in U.S. History
Jim Crow Laws

Black History and Blacks in U.S. History
Black History and Blacks in U.S. History


Jim Crow Laws
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Print Jim Crow Laws Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   6.89

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    blacken, equality, jurisdiction, literacy, louisiana, lynchings, minstrel, separately, unconstitutional, vigilante, enforcement, majority, slavery, education, infamous, segregation
     content words:    Civil War, United States, Black Codes, Jim Crow, Fourteenth Amendment, Ku Klux Klan, Homer Plessey, Supreme Court, United States Congress, Fifteenth Amendment

Other Languages
     Spanish: Las leyes de Jim Crow


Jim Crow Laws
By Jane Runyon
  

1     Many people believed that the end of the Civil War would bring great changes to the lives of slaves in the South. They were given freedom from slavery by the President of the United States. They were declared to be citizens of the United States. As citizens, they were guaranteed certain rights by the Constitution. All should have been well. But it wasn't.
 
2     To be honest, it wasn't just the southern states that had problems with equality. Many northern states also had a tradition of segregation. Blacks and whites lived separately, worked separately, and ate separately. It was just their habit and no one thought much about it.
 
3     The southern states believed in segregation and slavery. Blacks often worked closely with whites, but they were the property of the whites. They could be bought and sold. They had no say in who governed them.
 
4     After the Civil War, many whites intended to retain their hold on blacks through the use of laws that became known as Black Codes. These were special rules that blacks were held to. White people didn't have to follow these same rules. Eventually, these Black Codes became known as Jim Crow laws.

Paragraphs 5 to 11:
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