Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Native Americans
Native American Rugs and Blankets

Native Americans
Native Americans


Native American Rugs and Blankets
Print Native American Rugs and Blankets Reading Comprehension with Fourth Grade Work

Print Native American Rugs and Blankets Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

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Print Native American Rugs and Blankets Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 4 to 6
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   6.61

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    asset, churro, hand-made, loom, looms, sheered, symbolize, spiritual, repetitive, pioneer, meaning, legend, weaver, artists, traveler, especially
     content words:    Native Americans, Spider Woman, Spider Man, Sante Fe Trail, Serape Navajo, Prickly Pear, Pueblo Indians, Navajo Indians


Native American Rugs and Blankets
By Colleen Messina
  

1     The threads of a blanket or a rug may seem like simple craft materials. However, for Native Americans, the threads mean much more. Each thread might symbolize a thought of the artist. Weaving becomes much more than a craft. It is an important tradition for the Navajo culture because it is a vital link to their past.
 
2     According to a Navajo legend, their tradition of weaving comes from a holy person named Spider Woman. She taught them to weave on a loom that was designed by Spider Man. This was not the popular superhero, since the legend is hundreds of years old. The different kinds of poles of the loom were made of sky and earth. The weaving tools came from sun rays, rock crystals, white shells, and lightning. Traditionally, men built the looms, but women did the weaving.
 
3     Anthropologists believe that the Navajos learned to weave from the Pueblo people by 1650. They were influenced by Spanish settlers who inspired them to weave with wool from fuzzy churro sheep. Before that, the Indians used cotton. The Spanish people also introduced the Indians to indigo dye, which added blue to their rugs. Soon, the Navajo blankets were much more colorful. At first, the Native Americans only wove blankets. Later, they wove rugs to sell to tourists.

Paragraphs 4 to 9:
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Native Americans
             Native Americans


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United States
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    American Government  
 
    Black History and Blacks in U.S. History  
 
    Children in History  
 
    Government Careers  
 
    Hispanic Heritage  
 
    How Can I Help?  
 
 
    Immigration  
 
    National Parks and Monuments  
 
    Native Americans  
 
    Presidents of the United States  
 
    Women's History  
 


United States History
    A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)
 
 
    A New Nation
(1776-1830)
 
 
    After the Civil War
(1865-1870)
 
 
    American Revolution  
 
    Cold War
(1947-1991)
 
 
    Colonial America (1492-1776)  
 
    Lewis and Clark
(1804-1806)
 
 
    Pearl Harbor  
 
    Spanish American War (1898)  
 
    The 1890's  
 
    The 1900's  
 
    The 1910's  
 
    The 1920's  
 
    The 1930's  
 
 
    The 1940's  
 
    The 1950's  
 
    The 1960's  
 
    The 1970's  
 
    The 1980's  
 
    The 1990's  
 
    The 2000's  
 
    The Civil War
(1861-1865)
 
 
    The Great Depression
(1929-1945)
 
 
    The United States Grows
(1865-1900)
 
 
    The War of 1812  
 
    Wild, Wild West  
 
    World War I
(1914-1918)
 
 
    World War II  
 


50 States

             Fifty States Theme Unit


Document Based Activities
      Document Based Activities



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