Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Hispanic Heritage
Celebrating Independence

Hispanic Heritage
Hispanic Heritage


Celebrating Independence
Print Celebrating Independence Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

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Print Celebrating Independence Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 7
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   5.82

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    reenact, conquistador, vendors, society, original, Nueva, traditional, priest, mariachi, celebration, throne, Hola, flown, plaza, guacamole, gain
     content words:    Mexico City, Hernan Cortez, Nueva Espana, New Spain, Native Indians, On September, Father Hidalgo, China Poblanas, National Palace, Viva Mexico


Celebrating Independence
By Jane Runyon
  

1     Hola! Welcome to Mexico City. You have arrived here on a very special day. Today is September 16. This is the day Mexicans all over the world celebrate the independence of their country. Would you like to hear the story that explains this day?
 
2     Many hundreds of years ago, different civilizations of Indians lived in Mexico. There were Olmecs, Toltecs, and Mayas. The most powerful of these groups was the Aztecs. In 1521, a Spanish conquistador named Hernan Cortez and 500 soldiers came to the Aztec capital city. Cortez had made friends with natives who were enemies of the Aztecs. They helped Cortez.
 
3     In the fall of 1521, the Spanish killed the Aztec leader. They were eventually able to take over the whole city. The Spanish now ruled a very large part of the country. They named their new country "Nueva Espana" or New Spain. The Spanish kept control of New Spain for three hundred years.
 
4     Life was not easy during those years of Spanish control. The soldiers were not kind to the natives of the area. They brought disease with them that killed large numbers of people. It is thought that there were 20 million Indians in the territory when the Spanish arrived. One hundred years later, only one million remained.
 
5     The Spanish believed that there was a difference in the types of people living in New Spain. They had their own ideas of who should be in what class of society. Of course, the people born in Spain were to be considered the highest class of people. Next were the children born to the Spanish in the new world. They were called Criollos. Under them were the children born to Spanish and Indian parents called Mestizos. Native Indians were near the bottom of society. They were called Indios. Lastly, there were the African slaves brought to the new world to do heavy labor. They were called Negros.

Paragraphs 6 to 11:
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Hispanic Heritage
             Hispanic Heritage


United States
             United States


    American Government  
 
    Black History and Blacks in U.S. History  
 
    Children in History  
 
    Government Careers  
 
    Hispanic Heritage  
 
    How Can I Help?  
 
 
    Immigration  
 
    National Parks and Monuments  
 
    Native Americans  
 
    Presidents of the United States  
 
    Women's History  
 


United States History
    A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)
 
 
    A New Nation
(1776-1830)
 
 
    After the Civil War
(1865-1870)
 
 
    American Revolution  
 
    Cold War
(1947-1991)
 
 
    Colonial America (1492-1776)  
 
    Lewis and Clark
(1804-1806)
 
 
    Pearl Harbor  
 
    Spanish American War (1898)  
 
    The 1890's  
 
    The 1900's  
 
    The 1910's  
 
    The 1920's  
 
    The 1930's  
 
 
    The 1940's  
 
    The 1950's  
 
    The 1960's  
 
    The 1970's  
 
    The 1980's  
 
    The 1990's  
 
    The 2000's  
 
    The Civil War
(1861-1865)
 
 
    The Great Depression
(1929-1945)
 
 
    The United States Grows
(1865-1900)
 
 
    The War of 1812  
 
    Wild, Wild West  
 
    World War I
(1914-1918)
 
 
    World War II  
 


50 States

             Fifty States Theme Unit


Document Based Activities
      Document Based Activities



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