Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Animal Themes
Insects
Invertebrates
Mosquitoes

Animal Themes
Animal Themes


Mosquitoes
Print Mosquitoes Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Mosquitoes Reading Comprehension


Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 6 to 8
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   7.68

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    standing, swelling, rafts, encephalitis, blood-sucking, burning, dengue, filariasis, horn-like, mosquito-transmitted, repellent, syringe-like, reproduce, rank, siphon, organic
     content words:    West Nile

Other Languages
     Spanish: Los Mosquitos


Mosquitoes   

1     On a list of the world's most hated insects, mosquitoes usually have a high rank. We dislike them because bites from mosquitoes can cause skin irritation and swelling. The itching, burning feeling from mosquito bites can be so unpleasant that no medication seems to relieve it. To make matters worse, mosquitoes are carriers of dreadful -- if not deadly -- diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, encephalitis, West Nile virus, and filariasis. It is no wonder that we use any means we can to try to keep their population under control! To do that, we must first understand their lifecycle.
 
2     Mosquitoes start their life in the form of eggs. Before a female mosquito lays a batch of eggs, she has to take in extra protein. To obtain it, she turns into a tiny vampire. Using her syringe-like mouthpart, a female mosquito can easily pierce through our skin to draw blood. Once she satisfies her thirst for blood, she flies away and lays as many as 400 eggs on the surface of standing or slow-moving water. Depending on the species, a female mosquito's eggs may float either alone or in clusters (called rafts). Usually within a few days, these eggs hatch into larvae, also called wrigglers.
 
3     A wriggler feeds on organic debris and microorganisms in the water. It has a tube (called a siphon) that it uses to poke above the water's surface for breathing. After shedding its skin (molting) four times, the mosquito larva is ready to enter the third stage of its life -- the pupa (or tumbler). During this period, the pupa continues to live in the water. It bears two horn-like siphons on its thorax for easy access to air. It does not eat. Rather, it puts all its efforts into transforming itself. When the metamorphosis is complete, a slender, winged adult mosquito emerges from the pupa. As soon as it is strong enough to fly, it takes off from the water's surface. Within a few days, it starts breeding. If the adult mosquito is a male, he will spend his lifetime feeding on nectar and other plant juices. If it is a female, she will enjoy the same sugary diet until she is ready to reproduce. Then, she becomes a blood-sucking maniac!

Paragraphs 4 to 5:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



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Animal Themes
             Animal Themes


Insects
             Insects


Invertebrates
             Invertebrates


More Lessons
             Fresh Water
             Rain Forest



Animals
    Amphibians  
 
    Birds  
 
    Deserts  
 
    Fish  
 
    Freshwater  
 
    Grasslands  
 
    Insects  
 
 
    Invertebrates  
 
    Mammals  
 
    Oceans  
 
    Polar Regions  
 
    Rain Forest  
 
    Reptiles  
 



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