Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Animal Themes
Invertebrates
Oceans
Chitons

Animal Themes
Animal Themes


Chitons
Print Chitons Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Chitons Reading Comprehension


Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 6 to 8
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   8.06

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    chiton, finding, gumboot, intertidal, KIE-tons, tongue-like, woodlice, woodlouse, horny, rasp, embedded, littoral, terrestrial, calcareous, mantle, exception


Chitons   

1     At the seashore, one of the shells you might find is that of a chiton. Chitons (pronounced "KIE-tons") have eight overlapping calcareous plates on their backs. These eight plates are chitons' shells. If threatened, they can roll themselves into balls, exposing only their armor, to deter hungry predators.
 
2     The flattened, oval appearance and means of self-defense of chitons are quite similar to those of woodlice (singular: woodlouse). Nevertheless, the two animals are not related. Chitons are marine mollusks. They are related to snails, clams, and octopuses. Woodlice are terrestrial (land-dwelling) crustaceans. Their close relatives include lobsters, shrimp, and crabs. A chiton does not have antennae and possesses only a large, muscular foot. A woodlouse has two antennae and seven pairs of feet!

Paragraphs 3 to 4:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



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Animal Themes
             Animal Themes


Invertebrates
             Invertebrates


Oceans
             Oceans



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