Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Science Process Skills
Experimenting for Answers

Science Process Skills
Science Process Skills


Experimenting for Answers
Print Experimenting for Answers Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

Print Experimenting for Answers Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Experimenting for Answers Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 7
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   8.99

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    inference, operational, unanswered, variable, hypothesis, faulty, helping, various, based, design, education, scientist, focus, possibly, affects, equipment


Experimenting for Answers
By Trista L. Pollard
  

1     There are many questions in life. Some are answered after little research; however, some go unanswered for many years, possibly forever. The way scientists search for the answers to their questions is through the science process skill called experimenting.
 
2     When you experiment in your science class, you may think you are just "doing something to see what happens." However, to true scientists, when you experiment you carry out an operation or procedure under controlled conditions in order to discover an unknown effect or law. Experimenting is one of the most important process skills because it also includes the other six process skills: observing, classifying, communicating, inferring, predicting, and measuring. During an experiment scientists state a hypothesis (a possible answer to the question) and design procedures with controlled variables to test their hypothesis.
 
3     An operational question, or scientific question, includes an inference that can be tested. For example, you are helping your favorite physical education teacher clean out her equipment closet. As you are herding the various types of balls into their labeled bins, you observe one ball roll from the top shelf to the floor and bounce very high after it hits the floor. You began to wonder, "Does height at which the ball is dropped affect how high it will bounce?" You have just asked an operational question based on your observations. Operational questions help scientists to focus on the specific action they want to take to produce a result. In this case you want to determine if the ball's drop height will affect the ball's bounce height.

Paragraphs 4 to 5:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



Weekly Reading Books

          Create Weekly Reading Books

Prepare for an entire week at once!


Feedback on Experimenting for Answers
Leave your feedback on Experimenting for Answers   (use this link if you found an error in the story)



Science Process Skills
             Science Process Skills


Science
             Science


    Careers in Science  
 
    Caring for Earth  
 
    Clouds  
 
    Dinosaurs  
 
    Earth's Land  
 
    Earth  
 
    Earthquakes  
 
    Electricity  
 
    Energy  
 
    Erosion  
 
    Food Pyramid  
 
    Food Webs and Food Chain  
 
    Forces and Motion  
 
    Fossils  
 
    Health and Nutrition  
 
    How Things Work  
 
    Landforms  
 
    Life Science  
 
    Light  
 
    Magnets  
 
    Matter  
 
 
    Moon  
 
    Natural Disasters  
 
    Photosynthesis  
 
    Plant and Animal Cells  
 
    Plants  
 
    Rocks and Minerals  
 
    Science Process Skills  
 
    Scientific Notation  
 
    Seasons  
 
    Simple Machines  
 
    Soil  
 
    Solar System  
 
    Sound  
 
    Space and Stars  
 
    Sun  
 
    Tsunami  
 
    Volcanoes  
 
    Water Cycle  
 
    Water  
 
    Weather  
 



Copyright © 2017 edHelper