Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Earthquakes
What "Seis" Shake?

Earthquakes
Earthquakes


What "Seis" Shake?
Print What "Seis" Shake? Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

Print What "Seis" Shake? Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print What "Seis" Shake? Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 5 to 7
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   8.9

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    earthquake-prone, seises, seismo, seismogram, seismograph, seismologists, transverse, seismic, origin, displace, intensity, estimate, epicenter, mantle, seis, seismology


What "Seis" Shake?
By Trista L. Pollard
  

1     Keeping track of the earth as it rotates, revolves, shakes, erupts, and erodes is a tough job. So when there is rumbling and rolling below the earth's surface, you don't just call any earth scientist. You need the experts. This is when a voice must call out, "Is there a seismologist near the plates?"
 
2     First of all, seismology is the study of earthquakes and their causes. Seismologists are responsible for monitoring earthquakes and other seismic activity. In case you are curious, seismo is the Greek word for earthquakes. Now keep in mind, seismologists may not be near the actual plates when they monitor seismic activity. However, they have the tools to help them locate earthquakes and fault zones. They also have the data from these tools or instruments to build models of fault zones to predict where and when future quakes will occur.
 
3     These scientists use seismographs, which are instruments that record and measure seismic waves and vibrations. When these waves travel through the earth or along the earth's surface, the seismograph records a "zigzag" line called a seismogram. The lines on the seismogram show the changing intensity (power) of the vibrations as the ground surface is moving beneath the seismograph. Seismologists use the measurements to determine the time, the epicenter, the focus, and type of fault where the earthquake is occurring. Scientists can also estimate the amount of energy being released by the earthquake and the speed of the seismic waves. Let's roll away from the "seises" for a moment and get more acquainted with the waves.

Paragraphs 4 to 6:
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Earthquakes
             Earthquakes


Science
             Science


    Careers in Science  
 
    Caring for Earth  
 
    Clouds  
 
    Dinosaurs  
 
    Earth's Land  
 
    Earth  
 
    Earthquakes  
 
    Electricity  
 
    Energy  
 
    Erosion  
 
    Food Pyramid  
 
    Food Webs and Food Chain  
 
    Forces and Motion  
 
    Fossils  
 
    Health and Nutrition  
 
    How Things Work  
 
    Landforms  
 
    Life Science  
 
    Light  
 
    Magnets  
 
    Matter  
 
 
    Moon  
 
    Natural Disasters  
 
    Photosynthesis  
 
    Plant and Animal Cells  
 
    Plants  
 
    Rocks and Minerals  
 
    Science Process Skills  
 
    Scientific Notation  
 
    Seasons  
 
    Simple Machines  
 
    Soil  
 
    Solar System  
 
    Sound  
 
    Space and Stars  
 
    Sun  
 
    Tsunami  
 
    Volcanoes  
 
    Water Cycle  
 
    Water  
 
    Weather  
 



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