Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Endangered Animals Theme Unit
Mammals
Bengal Tiger

Endangered Animals Theme Unit
Endangered Animals Theme Unit


Bengal Tiger
Print Bengal Tiger Reading Comprehension with Third Grade Work

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Print Bengal Tiger Reading Comprehension with Fifth Grade Work

Print Bengal Tiger Reading Comprehension


A Short Reader

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 3 to 5
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   3.77

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    bengal, birth, destruction, twentieth, pounds, roar, male, buffalo, between, kinds, large, protect, weigh, mostly, during, avoid

Other Languages
     Spanish: Tigre de Bengala


Bengal Tiger
By Cindy Grigg
  

1     Tigers are mammals. Females give birth to litters of two to six babies. The mother tiger raises her babies without help from the male. Cubs learn to hunt when they are about a year and a half old. They stay with their mother until about three years of age.
 
2     Tigers are endangered. There were once eight different kinds of tigers. Three of those became extinct during the twentieth century. Hunting and the destruction of forests have cut the number of tigers to only a few. All five kinds of tigers are endangered today. Estimates say there are only a few thousand tigers still living in the wild.

Paragraphs 3 to 4:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



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Endangered Animals Theme Unit
             Endangered Animals Theme Unit


Mammals
             Mammals



Animals
    Amphibians  
 
    Birds  
 
    Deserts  
 
    Fish  
 
    Freshwater  
 
    Grasslands  
 
    Insects  
 
 
    Invertebrates  
 
    Mammals  
 
    Oceans  
 
    Polar Regions  
 
    Rain Forest  
 
    Reptiles  
 



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