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Skywriting

How Things Work
How Things Work


Skywriting
Print Skywriting Reading Comprehension with Sixth Grade Work

Print Skywriting Reading Comprehension


Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 6 to 8
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   7.25

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    skytyping, skywriter, skywriters, readable, cockpit, lasting, electronic, writing, spells, traditional, trigger, marriage, formation, planes, remain, valve
     content words:    Pepsi-Cola Company


Skywriting
By Sharon Fabian
  

1     Skywriting was invented in the 1920s. Not long after that, it was discovered by the Pepsi-Cola Company, and soon skywriting had become the popular new form of advertisement.
 
2     Skywriting seemed perfect for advertising. It could be seen for miles, and anyone outdoors at the time was sure to notice it. Also, skywriting seemed to leave a lasting impression in people's minds.
 
3     In traditional skywriting, a single plane spells out words in the sky using a trail of white smoke. In a more modern kind of skywriting called skytyping, several planes work together, directed by a computer, to spell out words in white dots of smoke.
 
4     Skywriting is done by a pilot with a small plane that is light and fast. He writes the letters in the sky by doing all sorts of maneuvers including turns, twists, banks, and loops.
 
5     To be a skywriter, a pilot must practice and practice. To help get the letters right, he may carry a card with him in the cockpit that has the words written upside down to use as a guide. At first, the skywriting may look like it was done by a third grader. It's not easy to write huge letters in the sky with no lines and no margins to guide you, but with practice, a pilot's skywriting becomes smoother and better looking.

Paragraphs 6 to 12:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



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