Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Worksheets and No Prep Teaching Resources
Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Mammals
Kinkajous

Mammals
Mammals


Kinkajous
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Print Kinkajous Reading Comprehension


A Short Reader

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   grades 3 to 5
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   4.31

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    brownish-gray, canopy, kinkajou, kinkajous, mainly, nocturnal, prehensile, pounds, bears, underneath, omnivores, hollow, manipulate, along, short, between
     content words:    South America


Kinkajous
By Sheri Skelton
  

1     Kinkajous are little mammals. They are related to the raccoon. They live in tropical forests in Central and South America. They spend lots of time in trees. They run along tree branches. They jump from tree to tree. Kinkajous have prehensile tails. A prehensile tail can be used to hold and manipulate objects. A kinkajou can wrap its tail around a branch and hold on. The tail also helps a kinkajou to balance. A sleeping kinkajou curled up in the hollow of tree might use its tail as a blanket.
 
2     Kinkajous have woolly fur. The top of their fur is gold or brownish-gray. The fur is gray underneath. Kinkajous have short legs. They have sharp claws. Their ears are small. An average kinkajou is about twenty inches long. It weighs between five and six pounds.

Paragraphs 3 to 4:
For the complete story with questions: click here for printable



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Mammals
             Mammals



Animals
    Amphibians  
 
    Birds  
 
    Deserts  
 
    Fish  
 
    Freshwater  
 
    Grasslands  
 
    Insects  
 
 
    Invertebrates  
 
    Mammals  
 
    Oceans  
 
    Polar Regions  
 
    Rain Forest  
 
    Reptiles  
 



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