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Reading Comprehension Worksheets
Black History and Blacks in U.S. History
A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)

The Abolitionist Movement

Black History and Blacks in U.S. History
Black History and Blacks in U.S. History


The Abolitionist Movement
Print The Abolitionist Movement Reading Comprehension with Fourth Grade Work

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Print The Abolitionist Movement Reading Comprehension

Reading Level
     edHelper's suggested reading level:   high interest, readability grades 4 to 5
     Flesch-Kincaid grade level:   4.56

Vocabulary
     challenging words:    abolitionists, antislavery, slaveholder, society, slavery, filed, illegal, bankers, slave, jobs, division, freedom, caption, lead, divide, mill
     content words:    Fredrick Douglass, United States, African Americans, Maria Stewart, Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Civil War


The Abolitionist Movement
By Cathy Pearl
  

1     Caption: Frederick Douglass
 
2     As slavery grew in the South, the number of people who didn't want slavery grew in the North. Abolitionists were people who wanted to end slavery completely in the United States. Some wanted slavery to end slowly. They thought it would end if it wasn't allowed in the new states in the West. Others demanded that slavery end right away.
 
3     African Americans who were free had a large part in this idea of ending slavery. Some tried to end slavery in the courts. They filed lawsuits. Others had people sign petitions. In the 1820s, an abolitionist newspaper was started. In the newspaper were stories about how badly slaves were treated. The writers hoped that these stories would make more people want to end slavery.
 
4     Others called for much stronger things. Some called for African Americans to free themselves any way that they could. Maria Stewart also spoke out against slavery. She was one of the first women to do this.
 
5     The abolitionist that is most well known is Frederick Douglass. He was born a slave. At first, he lived in Maryland. When he was younger, he did not follow the rules. He learned to read when he was a slave. This was illegal under the slave codes.

Paragraphs 6 to 15:
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Black History and Blacks in U.S. History
             Black History and Blacks in U.S. History


A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)

             A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)



More Lessons
             Special Education United States History Materials for Teachers


United States
             United States


    American Government  
 
    Black History and Blacks in U.S. History  
 
    Children in History  
 
    Government Careers  
 
    Hispanic Heritage  
 
    How Can I Help?  
 
 
    Immigration  
 
    National Parks and Monuments  
 
    Native Americans  
 
    Presidents of the United States  
 
    Women's History  
 


United States History
    A Nation Divided
(1840-1861)
 
 
    A New Nation
(1776-1830)
 
 
    After the Civil War
(1865-1870)
 
 
    American Revolution  
 
    Cold War
(1947-1991)
 
 
    Colonial America (1492-1776)  
 
    Lewis and Clark
(1804-1806)
 
 
    Pearl Harbor  
 
    Spanish American War (1898)  
 
    The 1890's  
 
    The 1900's  
 
    The 1910's  
 
    The 1920's  
 
    The 1930's  
 
 
    The 1940's  
 
    The 1950's  
 
    The 1960's  
 
    The 1970's  
 
    The 1980's  
 
    The 1990's  
 
    The 2000's  
 
    The Civil War
(1861-1865)
 
 
    The Great Depression
(1929-1945)
 
 
    The United States Grows
(1865-1900)
 
 
    The War of 1812  
 
    Wild, Wild West  
 
    World War I
(1914-1918)
 
 
    World War II  
 


50 States

             Fifty States Theme Unit


Document Based Activities
      Document Based Activities



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